Tag Archives: Genesis

THE TANAKH, TALMUD AND TRINITY

By:

Joe Butta and Steven Daskal

Christian Messianic Analysis and Apologetics

For the past 2000 years Rabbinic Jews and the followers of Jesus of Nazareth have failed to come to a common understanding concerning how to interpret the Tanakh or Jewish Bible. Rabbinic understanding is grounded in the following verse found in the Book of Deuteronomy:

6:4 “ Shema Yisrael, Adonai Elohaynu Adonai Echud” This can be translated as ‘Hear O Israel the Lord our God  The Lord alone or The Lord our God is one Lord or Listen Israel YHVH is our God,  YHVH  is One’.  It is understood that YHVH is God.  Echud can be understood in the sense that Only YHVH is God. No other god is God.  Also there is one God and it is YHVH Alone.

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Genesis – Judges… Sin is the Problem

By

Joe Butta

Christian Messianic Analysis and Apologetics

In the Jewish scriptures known as Tenakh or Old Covenant one theme is constant throughout.  There will be problems brought about by the consequences of sin.  Knowing that sinful man could not remedy the situation the LORD God often sent someone to warn, admonish or save the people. After 1000 years of Biblical history people were so evil the Lord sent Noah to save what he could of humankind. Eight were saved. After another 1000 years the Lord sent Abraham to begin fulfilling his design for our salvation. During this time the Lord sent Melchizedek to remind Abraham that there was One who was greater.

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THE REAL STAR OF DAVID, SUN AND CRESCENT MOON

By:

Joe Butta & Steve Daskal

Genesis: Chapter 1

14 Then God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the sky to separate the day from the night. They will serve as signs for the appointed times and for days and years.15 They will be lights in the expanse of the sky to provide light on the earth.” And it was so. 16 God made the two great lights—the greater light to have dominion over the day and the lesser light to have dominion over the night—as well as the stars. 17 God placed them in the expanse of the sky to provide light on the earth, 18 to dominate the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 Evening came and then morning: the fourth day.   — Genesis 1:14-19 (HCSB)

 The earth in which we live was draped in darkness until the light was made to shine upon it. The lights in the sky are to serve as signs for appointed times, days and years. The greater light [sun] dominates day, stars are visible at night while a full moon would dominate the night.

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Has Anyone Seen the Face of God?

Christian Messianic Analysis and Apologetics

By: Steve Daskal and Joe Butta

No mortal human being has ever seen the Face of God — that is, God the Father.  Moses never saw God’s actual “face” — no man has except the God-Man, Yeshua/Jesus.

The emphasis in Exodus 33:11 is not on the “face-to-face” aspect, but on the last phrase, “as a man speaks to a friend,” [as translated in the NKJV, NIV84, & NASB].  One can speak to a friend “face-to-face” in the sense of speaking to them in person, relationally, but not look each other in the face [think of two people working on a project side-by-side, which in a sense is what God was doing by including Moses in His redemptive work and in creating the foundation for the nation of Israel].  This is what the QUEST Study Bible notes say — verse 11 is emphasizing that Moses, like Abraham before him and David who came after him, had a personal relationship with God.  Charles Ryrie and John MacArthur note that Moses never saw God’s actual “face” — no man has except the God-Man, Yeshua/Jesus.

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WHO IS MELCHIZEDEK?

BY: Steven E Daskal

This is a simple question at one level, and a much more complex one beyond that.  It is one of my favorite Biblical conundrums, because we know quite a bit, yet so little.  BTW, while Melchizedek is commonly used, the pronunciation and Hebrew spelling reflect Melkhizedek (the KH being the sound common to Semitic and Slavic languages, while CH is the sound common to many linguistic families, as found in “Church” or “Chalice”).  I tend to use the KH version.

At the simplest level, it is a reference back to Abram’s (later Abraham) life in Genesis:

(Gen 14:17-24 NIV84)  After Abram returned from defeating Kedorlaomer and the kings allied with him, the king of Sodom came out to meet him in the Valley of Shaveh (that is, the King’s Valley).

          Then Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine. He was priest of God Most High, and he blessed Abram, saying, “Blessed be Abram by God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth.  And blessed be God Most High, who delivered your enemies into your hand.” Then Abram gave him a tenth of everything.

          The king of Sodom said to Abram, “Give me the people and keep the goods for yourself.”  But Abram said to the king of Sodom, “I have raised my hand to the LORD, God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth, and have taken an oath that I will accept nothing belonging to you, not even a thread or the thong of a sandal, so that you will never be able to say, ‘I made Abram rich.’ I will accept nothing but what my men have eaten and the share that belongs to the men who went with me — to Aner, Eshcol and Mamre. Let them have their share.”

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Isaac – Strong Start, Sad Finish [Faith of Our Fathers 5]

Started Strong, But Did He Stay the Course?

Steve Daskal, CMAA

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Gen 24 — This long chapter contains the story of how Abraham endeavors to ensure that Isaac has children of his own from “good stock.” I’m not going to go through it verse by verse; you can read it on your own if you haven’t already. Essentially, Abraham is firmly determined to find a wife for Isaac “from amongst his own people” — someone of Semitic, Aramean descent, not a Hamitic Canaanite or Egyptian. He wisely does not want his son, whose descendants are to inherit the land, to marry into one of the pagan families of the “old order” in the land. He also is probably aware of, and saddened by, what happened to Lot, who had not been so careful with his children. Abraham’s anonymous servant is introduced here — and he has an important role for someone who is left anonymous. He may have been the Elieazer of Damascus, Abraham’s foreman spoken of in Gen 15:2, who would have been his heir had Isaac not been born, or perhaps one of Elieazer’s sons (among these people, servants had various degrees of rank, that were inheritable like property). The servant is made to swear two things — first that he would do his best to bring a wife to Isaac from amongst Isaac’s maternal cousins back in Paddan Aram, but above all, under no condition was he to bring or allow Isaac to go back to Aram! Abraham is confident that the servant will be successful; that God will send an angel to smooth his path before him to accomplish what is needful. Although Rebekah has never met her future husband, she seems quite willing to abandon her life in upper Mesopotamia and go in faith to meet and marry her new husband in a distant, unfamiliar land, knowing she will probably never see her family again.

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Abraham & Isaac – Justified By Faith [Faith of Our Fathers 4]

Justified by Faith

Steve Daskal

 Gen 21:1-21 — Isaac, the child of promise, the transmitter of the Abrahamic covenant to the next generation, is finally born. Isaac is an Anglicization of the Hebrew Yitzkhak [pronounced YEE-tz-khawk, which has the same consonant root as the Hebrew word for “laugh”]. We do not know the “how” of this miraculous conception and birth — given the realities of normal human biology, the LORD would have had to have re-enlivened long-dormant tissues, organs, and bodily functions, but for He who created man from dust, this was easy.

The friction between Sarah, the “founding mother” of the covenant, and Hagar the Egyptian servant, has continued on, and is now transmitted to Hagar’s son Ishmael, who “mocked” [laughed at, teased] Isaac, his younger half-brother.   By custom and by God’s decree, Isaac the son of Abraham his wife would supplant Ishmael, the son of a concubine, as Abraham’s heir in all senses of the word. Sarah demands that Hagar and Ishmael be expelled (this would be unusual according to the customs of the time), and God tells Abraham to do so. Ishmael leaves the field of view in the Torah. (Ishmael’s grand-nephew Joseph is sold to some of Ishmael’s direct descendants, who transport him to Egypt.) God’s mercy to Hagar and Ishmael is described in verses 15-21.

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