Tag Archives: Torah

ISRAEL: Does the Hebrew Bible indicate the Messiah, the Anointed One of the House of David, is divine?

Job 19

 

25 But I know my living Redeemer,
and He will stand on the dust at last.
26 Even after my skin has been destroyed,
yet I will see God in my flesh.
27 I will see Him myself;
my eyes will look at Him, and not as a stranger.
My heart longs within me.

Analysis: Before the advent of the prophets Job posed an interesting question. Will the Lord actually stand upon the earth?  Will those who have died be resurrected to see the Lord?  It was clear from the prophetic books of the Tenakh [but not from Torah] that there would be a resurrection of the [“righteous”] dead in the Last Day, and that God would again be among the people as He was in Eden. The Pharisees accepted this, as do modern or rabbinical Orthodox Jews, though they often add to this the belief that only after the Jews “clean up the world” and become more faithful will Messiah come.  [This is not too different from Muslim beliefs about the Mahdi, which are probably drawn from this.]

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Judeo-Christianity, Religion

ISRAEL: ACCORDING TO THE HEBREW BIBLE DID THE LORD EVER BECOME A MAN?

For over 2000 years Jews and the followers of Yeshua have disagreed concerning Yeshua’s claim of divinity.  The events concerning Yeshua’s words and actions coupled with the reaction of contemporary Jews gives us some great insight into the tension these claims caused 2000 years ago.

Matt. 9 …When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the man, “Take heart, son; your sins are forgiven.” At this, some of the teachers of the law said to themselves, “This fellow is blaspheming!”4 Knowing their thoughts, Jesus said, “Why do you entertain evil thoughts in your hearts? Which is easier: to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up and walk’? But I want you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.” So he said to the paralyzed man, “Get up, take your mat and go home.” Then the man got up and went home.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Judeo-Christianity

Khabad Lubavitch

The movement known as Khabad Lubavitch is mostly unknown outside of Jewish circles. It springs from Khasidic Orthodox Judaism with an emphasis on Jewish mysticism and messianism. The movement initiated with the teachings of its seven leaders (“Rebbes”), beginning with Rabbi Schneur Zalman (1745–1812). These leaders created thousands of books meant for Jewish study. The most notable Lubavitcher Rebbe of recent memory is Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902–1994). What makes this movement different from traditional Rabbinic Judaism is its outreach to ALL Jews not just Orthodox Jews. Currently 4,000 full-time families help direct more than 3,300 institutions with thousands dedicated to spreading the Khabad Lubavitcher message.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Judeo-Christianity, Miscellaneous, Religion

RABBINICAL JUDAISM:

 

In this post we continue our journey from non-belief through polytheism. The family of Abraham was also polytheists. From this Abraham heard a lone voice and brought monotheism to the family of humankind. Today the physical descendents of Abraham through Isaac and Jacob practice, to different degrees, Rabbinical Judaism. This is the Judaism that developed during the early Christian era. Yeshua (Jesus) was raised into a traditional Jewish family.  As the Roman era initiated after the conquest of Palestine in 63 B.C. the Romans, through their general Pompey, slaughtered all of the Jewish priestly class. From this point forward the Romans appointed the Chief priest to administer Temple ritual.  These appointments were usually made through another Jewish sect called the Sadducees. The Sadducees differed from the descendents of the Hasideans, who were the Pius Ones and observed the traditions of the Fathers, by only recognizing the first five books of the Tenakh as scripture. The Sadducees also did not believe in the resurrection of the dead. The Pharisees believed in the totality of the Jewish Bible but interpreted it through the prism of Jewish oral tradition.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Judeo-Christianity, Religion

Joseph – Prisoner to Prime Minister [Faith of Our Fathers] 7

 The Critical non-Patriarch

Blessed — even while living in the valley

/////\\\\\/////\\\\\////\\\\\/////\\\\\/////\\\\\

 An Encouragement: I encourage you to read through Genesis 37-50 on your own, since I can only hit the “high points” of this lengthy, worthwhile portion of Scripture.

 Joseph was the second-youngest child of Jacob, the third of the patriarchs (Abraham and Isaac) who were the founders of the tribe of the Hebrews. His mother was Rakhel (Rachel), one of Jacob’s two full wives. He had single full brother, Benjamin, who was the youngest in the family, but Rakhel died bearing him. He had many half-brothers and half-sisters, born to his aunt, Leah, and to his mother’s and aunt’s maidservants whom they gave to his father Jacob as secondary wives (sometimes referred to as concubines) to bear children to Jacob on their behalf, in accord with the pagan customs of the time. Rakhel and Leah were bitter rivals, Leah being the elder, Jacob’s first wife, and the mother of Jacob’s first sons, but Rakhel being the more beautiful, the one Jacob truly loved, and the one whose sons were Jacob’s favorites. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Judeo-Christianity, Steven E. Daskal

Isaac – Strong Start, Sad Finish [Faith of Our Fathers 5]

Started Strong, But Did He Stay the Course?

Steve Daskal, CMAA

/////\\\\\/////\\\\\////\\\\\/////\\\\\/////\\\\\

Gen 24 — This long chapter contains the story of how Abraham endeavors to ensure that Isaac has children of his own from “good stock.” I’m not going to go through it verse by verse; you can read it on your own if you haven’t already. Essentially, Abraham is firmly determined to find a wife for Isaac “from amongst his own people” — someone of Semitic, Aramean descent, not a Hamitic Canaanite or Egyptian. He wisely does not want his son, whose descendants are to inherit the land, to marry into one of the pagan families of the “old order” in the land. He also is probably aware of, and saddened by, what happened to Lot, who had not been so careful with his children. Abraham’s anonymous servant is introduced here — and he has an important role for someone who is left anonymous. He may have been the Elieazer of Damascus, Abraham’s foreman spoken of in Gen 15:2, who would have been his heir had Isaac not been born, or perhaps one of Elieazer’s sons (among these people, servants had various degrees of rank, that were inheritable like property). The servant is made to swear two things — first that he would do his best to bring a wife to Isaac from amongst Isaac’s maternal cousins back in Paddan Aram, but above all, under no condition was he to bring or allow Isaac to go back to Aram! Abraham is confident that the servant will be successful; that God will send an angel to smooth his path before him to accomplish what is needful. Although Rebekah has never met her future husband, she seems quite willing to abandon her life in upper Mesopotamia and go in faith to meet and marry her new husband in a distant, unfamiliar land, knowing she will probably never see her family again.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Judeo-Christianity, Steven E. Daskal

It Began With ABRAM [Faith of Our Fathers 1]

Dear Folks,  Before you dive into this new post please officially welcome Steven E. Daskal  to CMA&A. Steve is a historian and specializes in all forms of Judaica including Messianic Judaism.  This site will give attribution to all material created by Steven E. Daskal.

The story about God offering Himself and/or the Torah to many other peoples before the Jews were offered and accepted is a “Jewish joke,” not anything with Scriptural or historical merit.   Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Judeo-Christianity, Steven E. Daskal