Tag Archives: Torah

Genesis – Judges… Sin is the Problem

By

Joe Butta

Christian Messianic Analysis and Apologetics

In the Jewish scriptures known as Tenakh or Old Covenant one theme is constant throughout.  There will be problems brought about by the consequences of sin.  Knowing that sinful man could not remedy the situation the LORD God often sent someone to warn, admonish or save the people. After 1000 years of Biblical history people were so evil the Lord sent Noah to save what he could of humankind. Eight were saved. After another 1000 years the Lord sent Abraham to begin fulfilling his design for our salvation. During this time the Lord sent Melchizedek to remind Abraham that there was One who was greater.

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Filed under Faith, History, Judeo-Christianity, Tanakh

THE REAL STAR OF DAVID, SUN AND CRESCENT MOON

By:

Joe Butta & Steve Daskal

Genesis: Chapter 1

14 Then God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the sky to separate the day from the night. They will serve as signs for the appointed times and for days and years.15 They will be lights in the expanse of the sky to provide light on the earth.” And it was so. 16 God made the two great lights—the greater light to have dominion over the day and the lesser light to have dominion over the night—as well as the stars. 17 God placed them in the expanse of the sky to provide light on the earth, 18 to dominate the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 Evening came and then morning: the fourth day.   — Genesis 1:14-19 (HCSB)

 The earth in which we live was draped in darkness until the light was made to shine upon it. The lights in the sky are to serve as signs for appointed times, days and years. The greater light [sun] dominates day, stars are visible at night while a full moon would dominate the night.

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Filed under Faith, Islam, Judeo-Christianity, Messiah, Miscellaneous, Religion, Salvation, Tanakh

Has Anyone Seen the Face of God?

Christian Messianic Analysis and Apologetics

By: Steve Daskal and Joe Butta

No mortal human being has ever seen the Face of God — that is, God the Father.  Moses never saw God’s actual “face” — no man has except the God-Man, Yeshua/Jesus.

The emphasis in Exodus 33:11 is not on the “face-to-face” aspect, but on the last phrase, “as a man speaks to a friend,” [as translated in the NKJV, NIV84, & NASB].  One can speak to a friend “face-to-face” in the sense of speaking to them in person, relationally, but not look each other in the face [think of two people working on a project side-by-side, which in a sense is what God was doing by including Moses in His redemptive work and in creating the foundation for the nation of Israel].  This is what the QUEST Study Bible notes say — verse 11 is emphasizing that Moses, like Abraham before him and David who came after him, had a personal relationship with God.  Charles Ryrie and John MacArthur note that Moses never saw God’s actual “face” — no man has except the God-Man, Yeshua/Jesus.

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WHO IS MELCHIZEDEK?

BY: Steven E Daskal

This is a simple question at one level, and a much more complex one beyond that.  It is one of my favorite Biblical conundrums, because we know quite a bit, yet so little.  BTW, while Melchizedek is commonly used, the pronunciation and Hebrew spelling reflect Melkhizedek (the KH being the sound common to Semitic and Slavic languages, while CH is the sound common to many linguistic families, as found in “Church” or “Chalice”).  I tend to use the KH version.

At the simplest level, it is a reference back to Abram’s (later Abraham) life in Genesis:

(Gen 14:17-24 NIV84)  After Abram returned from defeating Kedorlaomer and the kings allied with him, the king of Sodom came out to meet him in the Valley of Shaveh (that is, the King’s Valley).

          Then Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine. He was priest of God Most High, and he blessed Abram, saying, “Blessed be Abram by God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth.  And blessed be God Most High, who delivered your enemies into your hand.” Then Abram gave him a tenth of everything.

          The king of Sodom said to Abram, “Give me the people and keep the goods for yourself.”  But Abram said to the king of Sodom, “I have raised my hand to the LORD, God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth, and have taken an oath that I will accept nothing belonging to you, not even a thread or the thong of a sandal, so that you will never be able to say, ‘I made Abram rich.’ I will accept nothing but what my men have eaten and the share that belongs to the men who went with me — to Aner, Eshcol and Mamre. Let them have their share.”

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Filed under Faith, Judeo-Christianity, Messiah, Steven E. Daskal, Tanakh

How Many Times Did Moses Climb Mt Sinai?

By:  Steve Daskal,

CHRISTIAN MESSIANIC ANALYSIS AND APOLOGETICS

 

** A brother in Christ recently asked me about a seeming inconsistency in the Exodus account of Moses’ interactions with God and the Israelites at Mt. Sinai.  He thought it appeared as if the number of trips up and trips down didn’t match.  I had never actually sat down to work this out, though I’ve been hearing and reading this story repeatedly since I was in grade school.  This is what I found:

Ex 19 — The Israelites are three months after leaving Egypt via Rephidim [located in the Sinai desert].  They’ve reached Sinai, and set up camp in front of the mountain.  Moses goes up the mountain the first time [v3], he returns to the people [v7] and warns them that they are going to get the terms of the Covenant, and they agree to them — without having heard them — based upon God’s taking them out of Egypt and providing for this huge mass of people in the desert for 3 months.

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Filed under General, Judeo-Christianity, Miscellaneous, Religion, Steven E. Daskal

Jewish Views on Messiah circa 30 A.D.

FROM: CHRISTIAN MESSIANIC ANALYSIS AND APOLOGETICS

BY: Steve Daskal

The Jewish faith, as was being taught & practiced in Jesus’ day, was no longer a single unified faith focused on “the Law and the Prophets,” but was made up of several sects that at best disdained or ignored each other, each following its own particular interpretations that suited them.

The Sadducees denied that anything beyond Torah [The Law, Pentateuch, Five Bks of Moses] was inspired of or delivered from God.  So, they didn’t accept that there would be a Messiah at all.  The Torah references frequently cited, such as Gen 3:15 and in Deuteronomy when Moses tells them that a Prophet like himself will come to lead Israel back to God after they have “fallen away,” point to from the perspectives of Christians, and of Pharisees, but they aren’t unambiguous/direct statements.  The Psalms & the Prophets were considered by the Sadducees the way we’d consider books by C.S. Lewis or G.K. Chesterton — good reading, edifying, but neither inspired nor authoritative for doctrine.  The Kohanim [the priesthood-by-descent] and many of the other Levites were Sadducees.  They controlled the Temple in Jesus’ day and had a sizeable presence on the Sanhedrin which was the religious court that had been granted ultimate socio-religious authority for the Jews of Judea under Roman rule.

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ISRAEL: Does the Hebrew Bible indicate the Messiah, the Anointed One of the House of David, is divine?

Job 19

 

25 But I know my living Redeemer,
and He will stand on the dust at last.
26 Even after my skin has been destroyed,
yet I will see God in my flesh.
27 I will see Him myself;
my eyes will look at Him, and not as a stranger.
My heart longs within me.

Analysis: Before the advent of the prophets Job posed an interesting question. Will the Lord actually stand upon the earth?  Will those who have died be resurrected to see the Lord?  It was clear from the prophetic books of the Tenakh [but not from Torah] that there would be a resurrection of the [“righteous”] dead in the Last Day, and that God would again be among the people as He was in Eden. The Pharisees accepted this, as do modern or rabbinical Orthodox Jews, though they often add to this the belief that only after the Jews “clean up the world” and become more faithful will Messiah come.  [This is not too different from Muslim beliefs about the Mahdi, which are probably drawn from this.]

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