Monthly Archives: March 2011

Book review for the Jewish People and Jesus

 

Dear Joe,

Last night I finished reading the
last chapter of your book, parts of which touched me so
deeply that I cried. Your book also opened the door
for me to now want to study the Tenakh and Torah and read in
depth the writings of Yeshua’s apostles and disciples,
something I’ve never done.

The amount of research you put into
this book is truly amazing, and I admire you for the way in
which you encouraged readers to decide for themselves.
Your responses to the objections were so thought-provoking
and on target! I thought at the beginning I would have
difficulty understanding this book, but realized the more I
read, the more interesting it became for me. I found
by reading each segue, objection, and response aloud helped
me to comprehend the message more clearly. Usually
late at night after the evening news, I would sit at my
kitchen table and read each section out loud, sometimes over
and over again until I ‘got it’.

Some sections were truly meaningful
to me. One is on page 184 in the segue, where you
write: “Biblically literate Christians who embrace
Yeshua do not just believe in him. They trust him and
love him. The Yeshua of history, the Yeshua of the
Gospels is worthy of our admiration and love.”

But the most troubling section of
the book for me and what brought tears of shame and empathy
as I read it late last night was on page 253, the
description of the torture and crucifixion of Yeshua.
I was truly moved. That part really got
me!

I pray the book opens many doors
toward reconciliation and that everyone may accept Yeshua as
the true Messiah. Excellent book, Joe! Bless
you!!

M.R. Shufeldt

 

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Yeshua is Messiah ben Joseph & Messiah ben David

 

In previous posts I’ve covered why Yeshua and only Yeshua can be the Messiah. The orthodox point of view heralds two messiahs. The rabbis see a suffering messiah and a messiah who will be the messiah King and who will defeat the enemies of Israel. Yeshua said at his first advent that he came to suffer in order to purchase the salvation of those who accept his sacrifice. He also predicted his resurrection. What we know is that he was publicly crucified, his tomb was empty, and neither the Judeans or Romans could produce a Yeshua corpse. If that wasn’t enough Yeshua’s Galilean followers became emboldened after his death. They preached messiah crucified and the Redeemer of those who accept him in the face of continual persecution. They paid the ultimate price. Yeshua claimed that he would come again. He predicted many signs that would occur before his appearing and by quoting Daniel 7: 13-14, he left no doubt how he would come. He will only come one way–on the clouds with power and great glory.

The rabbis tell the Jewish people if they consider accepting Yeshua they will forfeit their Jewishness. Since they see evidence of a suffering and a reigning messiah they promote the two messiahs coming once theory. Yeshua stated that the Tenakh spoke of one messiah coming twice. The rabbis speak of messiah ben Joseph and messiah ben David. Neither are divine as Yeshua claimed to be, yet the rabbis believe that both will be recognized by the Jewish people and absent genealogical proof will claim that messiah ben David is a descendant of Judah son of Jacob (Israel) and King David son of Jesse. The rabbinical dilema is to decide who will be born in Bethlehem and who will come on the clouds of heaven. It makes no sense that messiah ben Joseph will be born in David’s city Bethlehem. Messiah ben Joseph cannot come on the clouds of heaven because he is not divine and must die. Messiah ben David must be born in David’s city but how can he if the reigning messiah must come on the clouds of heaven? The rabbinic formula does not work. Only a messiah who was born in Bethlehem, died, resurrected, ascended into heaven and promised to come again on the clouds of heaven IS the Messiah. Baruch ato Adonai Elohaynu Yahveh–Baruch ha ba ba shem Adonai Yeshua ha’Mashiakh.

 

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